Jul 10

Five Murals in Your Neighborhood: Fairmount/Francisville

by: Laura Kochman & Aubrey Fink

We know you know that there are murals all over Philadelphia—no matter what neighborhood you call home, there’s a mural that you walk by every day. Maybe it makes you think whenever you see it, or maybe it’s faded into the background of your morning commute. Either way, public art is part of community identity, and we’re celebrating by calling out five murals in every Philly neighborhood, starting with ours! Here are five awesome murals right near the Mural Arts office.

EXPLORE WITH THE MURAL FINDER

Tribute to Diego Rivera, by Dietrick Adonis and Jane Golden 

Tribute to Diego Rivera, by Dietrick Adonis and Jane Golden. Photo by Mural Arts Philadelphia staff.

This bright, intricate mural may be named for Mexican painter Diego Rivera, but it also features his wife, famed artist Frida Kahlo (heard of her?). Rivera was a muralist himself, painting five during his lifetime.

Healing Power of Music, by Parris Stancell 

Healing Power of Music, by Parris Stancell. Photo by Jack Ramsdale.

Healing Power of Music was created in partnership with WXPN, beloved Philly public radio station. The mural is a visual representation of WXPN’s Musicians on Call Program, a nonprofit bringing local musicians to patients’ bedsides. This vibrant, patterned mural will definitely make you feel better.

Henry Ossawa Tanner: Letters of Influence, by Keir Johnston 

Henry Ossawa Tanner: Letters of Influence, by Keir Johnston. Photo by Steve Weinik.

Honoring African American painter Henry Ossawa Tanner, this mural recreates his famous painting The Banjo Lesson, demonstrating the power of passing art from mentor to student. The mural contains writing from students at Saint Gabriel’s hall, a residential treatment center for adjudicated youth, about what Tanner’s life and work means to them.

A Celebration of Poetry, by Parris Stancell 

A Celebration of Poetry, by Parris Stancell. Photo by Jack Ramsdale.

Not far from The Healing Power of Music, this mural uses primary colors to represent the African American poet’s journey across three settings: a house in Africa, a jazz scene, and a present-day poetry reading.

I Am the Atlantic, by Josh Sarantitis 

I Am the Atlantic © 2013 Mural Arts Philadelphia / Josh Sarantitis.

This Porch Light mural grapples with the effects of violence and trauma, particularly among youth. In partnership with the City’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, artist Josh Sarantitis and workshop facilitators guided discussions on dialogue, understanding, and healing—these conversations helped to develop the final mural design, which recognizes trauma while illuminating resilience.

EXPLORE WITH THE MURAL FINDER

Last updated: Jul 12, 2018

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